Are Early Show Renewals A Marketing Trick?

by on April 30, 2013

in Entertainment

Brusimm opinion

Of late, we hear it all the time. When a show gets a nod from a network for a renewal of the series. A few quick examples was HBO declaring they renewed Game of Thrones after one episode, and the same for Starz Da Vinci’s Demons. Or after 4 episodes of Bates Motel.

All too often these days we see a show start up a new season and with in a week or two, we’re hearing the news that the network is renewing the show for an additional season or two.

It always sounds awesome to hear, but sometimes I wonder about these announcements. Are they for real or just a new layer of marketing to suck in the consummate fan?

What do I mean by “new layer of marketing?”

It’s simple really.

How often have you sit around for nearly a full season of a show you KNOW is good, but you still have to wait till between seasons to hear if it’s been renewed or not? How often do you hear about NCIS or Law and Order being renewed one or two episodes into a season? That’s my point of pondering.

Even bad shows don’t get the bad news until near the end of a season or just before the next season adverts start to show up.  Heck in one case, a network just stopped talking about a show altogether after its season (series) finale and we never saw another peep out of it.

But after having spent the last few years studying the guile ways of marketing and how this multi-billion dollar industry is busy figuring out how to get your attention, well, this my friends, seems to be another smart trick from the book of marketing. Or more to the point, the psychology of catching your attention!

Yes, marketing is nothing more than mind tricks to help you decide what you like. And sure, more than likely you’d like what you like any way, but if you were on the bubble, what helps motivate your decisions?

Marketing is about a few things really. It’s about creating positive associations with products, no matter how they get you there.  And in this day and age, the “talk of the town” or “good gossip” is even more important of an aspect then it used to be.

And in my mind, that’s what category an early renewal announcement fits.  The premise of an early renewal has got to be one that sparks the mindset.  My guess is that this is the thinking networks and their marketing arms want you to think:

“If a network renewed a TV show so soon, that it’s got to be something to check out. Why else would they renew it then!? I better go check it out and see what everyone else is so agog about!”

But in my mind, the reality of it is that they can say anything they want now. By the end of the season, their intentions can easily change.  I’ve seen it enough times to know that nothing is written in stone.

And when it’s not in stone, I try not to set myself up for disappointments. I lie in wait. Then, when a premiere date is announced for a series, then I get happy about that!

To be honest, all I’m saying is don’t get so emotionally invested in something until you know the facts. Or when you know there is a date set for the next seasons’ premiere. Then, you can get jazzed for your favorite TV series.

As it is, we spend nearly 4 hours a day, on average, watching TV. You have to protect that investment and not let yourself get caught up by duplicitous announcements!

Studio Distribution Marketing Tactics?

Let’s segue into the Iron Man 3 overseas movie premieres.  There’s big bucks to be had overseas, as the movie ticket prices overseas are a bit higher than what they cost here in the United States.  But it can’t hurt when you’re pondering if you want to go see a movie, and lo-and-behold, look at how well the movie is being received by your fellow movie fans.  So to, rather than opening at the same time around the world, movies open in different places, as I can guess, to help pump up potential sales.

It’s not an evil thing you know.  They’re just helping you decide what you want to spend your money on!  LOL.

Disclaimer:  This is of course, all conjecture/opinion from Brusimm.com.  I’m a marketing hobbyist, who is super curious how things like TV ads and advertising in general work, and this piece is an extension of what I think I understand of the process.

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