My Olympus E-520 – The Pros and Cons

by on December 26, 2009

in consumer, consumer reviews

I bought my Olympus E-520 several months back. I’ve really enjoyed the camera with just a few issues that I haven’t really addressed yet.

First, I purchased my Olympus E-520 via a few deciding factors.

Over on my Consumers Report online subscription, I was looking for a balance between well rated cameras and decent prices.

I had narrowed my selection of cameras down to about 4 of them when a local camera shop had a sale… and that pushed me in the direction of owning this E-520.

The sale included the Olympus Evolt E-520 with a lens package of the 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6 and 70-300mm f/4.0-5.6 ED Zuiko Lenses package.

And when the local camera shop had a sale where they were paying the sales tax, well, you can see where I ended up!

The camera has served me incredibly well. It’s been quite the learning curve adjusting from my incredibly robust point and shoot Sony DSC-P150 camera (Sony Cyber Shots on Amazon ) that I’ve take approximately 30,000 pictures with.

In fact I need to carry the dang manual around with me everywhere when I take it places.

For regular, standard pics, this is an awesome camera. For scenes like those concerning Christmas lights on houses, it’s served me well also.

It has image stabilization in multiple directions, and is known as one of the more feature-packed cameras for it’s price range.

It has this creepy feature called face recognition. Yes, for many this isn’t a new thing but it trips me out since this is my first camera to have this feature and it can pick faces out of a crowd. (My camera is aliiive!)

The real life saver are the multitude of point-and-shoot modes, that sadly, I have to rely on in my plan-B of photo modes sometimes when I run out of talent in the brain!

My only slight short comings I have found in this camera is that I could not find how to set the camera to infinity. It’s a curse or another brain fart in the talent department.

I also can’t set my shortcut button to bring up the face-recognition feature. According to the manual, I can do a few moves and walla! But the options aren’t found as the manual describes it.

Yet I do just fine and I’ve take several hundred images with it to date.

The no sales tax sale thing really worked in my favor and the multiple lens package pretty much set me up from the get go and I’m pretty happy with the beast.

I have to be honest:

If you’re a real point and shoot kind of guy and like your small cameras, this camera has lots of presets and pulls you along into the 10 MP world… though more point-and-shoot cameras are there also.

For me, it’s got lots of buttons and I have to be real careful when I pick it up or I end up taking pictures of my foot with odd light settings… (But then I call it art!) but I’ve not been displeased with it.

It was very easy to jump into, it was easy to figure out how to move images to my PC and it’s got various options for data storage that range from a memory car to a mini-hard drive. (The mini-hard-drive is necessary if you want to engage the panoramic shooting mode!)

As a newbie looking in from the outside, I give the Olympus E-520 an 8 out of 10. It might be a 9 if I actually knew what I was doing but I seem to be in a permanent learning curve with this thing. But that’s me because I don’t pick it up frequently enough to get comfortable with it.

Here’s a lengthy, technical review of the Olympus E-520 over on DP Review.

I bought my Olympus E-520 several months back. I’ve really enjoyed the camera with just a few issues that I haven’t really addressed yet.

First, I purchased my Olympus E-520 via a few deciding factors.

Over on my Consumers Report online subscription, I was looking for a balance between well rated cameras and decent prices.

I had narrowed my selection of cameras down to about 4 of them when a local camera shop had a sale… and that pushed me in the direction of owning this E-520.

The sale included the Olympus Evolt E-520 with a lens package of the 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6 and 70-300mm f/4.0-5.6 ED Zuiko Lenses package.

And when the local camera shop had a sale where they were paying the sales tax, well, you can see where I ended up!

The camera has served me incredibly well. It’s been quite the learning curve adjusting from my incredibly robust point and shoot Sony DSC-P150 camera that I’ve take approximately 30,000 pictures with to this Olympus E520.

In fact I need to carry the dang manual around with me everywhere when I take it places.

For regular, standard pics, this is an awesome camera. For scenes like those concerning Christmas lights on houses, it’s served me well also.

It has image stabilization in multiple directions, and is known as one of the more feature-packed cameras for it’s price range.

It has this creepy feature called face recognition. Yes, for many this isn’t a new thing but it trips me out since this is my first camera to have this feature and it can pick faces out of a crowd. (My camera is aliiive!)

The real life saver are the multitude of point-and-shoot modes, that sadly, I have to rely on in my plan-B of photo modes sometimes when I run out of talent in the brain!

My only slight short comings I have found in this camera is that I could not find how to set the camera to infinity. It’s a curse or another brain fart in the talent department.

I also can’t set my shortcut button to bring up the face-recognition feature. According to the manual, I can do a few moves and walla! But the options aren’t found as the manual describes it.

Yet I do just fine and I’ve take several hundred images with it to date.

The no sales tax sale thing really worked in my favor and the multiple lens package pretty much set me up from the get go and I’m pretty happy with the beast.

I have to be honest:

If you’re a real point and shoot kind of guy and like your small cameras, this camera has lots of presets and pulls you along into the 10 MP world… though more point-and-shoot cameras are there also.

For me, it’s got lots of buttons and I have to be real careful when I pick it up or I end up taking pictures of my foot with odd light settings… (But then I call it art!) but I’ve not been displeased with it.

It was very easy to jump into, it was easy to figure out how to move images to my PC and it’s got various options for data storage that range from a memory car to a mini-hard drive. (The mini-hard-drive is necessary if you want to engage the panoramic shooting mode!)

As a newbie looking in from the outside, I give the camera an 8 out of 10. It might be a 9 if I actually knew what I was doing but I seem to be in a permanent learning curve with this thing. But that’s me because I don’t pick it up frequently enough to get comfortable with it.

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