Netflix and CBS Start A Running Agreement on Older Shows

by on March 1, 2011

in Entertainment

CBS NetworkHere’s some news:  Netflix is adding to its library of streaming shows by entering into a 2-year agreement with CBS to add some older popular shows such as Medium, Flashpoint, Frasier, Cheers and more to their available streaming inventory.  These new additions will be available for instant streaming, as will other classic series such as all generations of the sci-fi series Star Trek and installments of The Twilight Zone.

This deal between Netflix and CBS is a two-year non-exclusive deal and CBS has the option to extend the deal two more years if they wish to.  Of course, it’s not free.  These new library editions will be part of Netflix’s $7.99 per month subscription service.  Sigh.

Keep in mind though that the ever savvy CBS has not allowed their content to be available to any streaming subscription service before this.  Of course, this addition of streaming content to Netflix is no surprise.

Back in October of 2010 it was reported that online streaming content outsold/outpaced DVD rentals, where 66% of their users watched streaming content versus a year previous when it was only 44% of their subscriber base.

As Netflix CEO Reed Hastings put it, “By every measure, we are now primarily a streaming company that also offers DVD-by-mail.

But don’t worry, Netflix is not cutting out its DVD delivery service.  At least not yet.  Streaming online content is becoming the way to go.  As Jon Favreau mentioned in an extra byte on the Iron Man 2 DVD, DVD’s are becoming more of a collectors medium than a watchers medium.

If you think about it, with Streaming, it alleviates the time and space required to tackle a DVD, just as much as Amazon’s Kindle is replacing all that wall space that books take up in a person’s library.  In time, I easily see streaming becoming the mainstream measure of watching as more and more American’s discover easier and more affordable access to the internet.

I just wish it would become centralized so we can stop paying out to so many different sources for access to TV / movies.  First we pay for cable, then Hulu wants a piece of our wallet, then Netflix is asking one low rate, and now Amazon is teasing up a premium membership.  I don’t know how many times I’m willing to shell out for access to something we could have already seen on TV or as a rental.

If you think about it, networks, studios and such really can make a pretty penny off a single entity as formats to watch the projects changes.  When music went from 8-track to cassette to DVD to digital downloads, as much as TV and movies followed video tape, DVd and streaming, how many times have we purchased the same title so we can play it in the newest format or keep it in our collection?

Just sayin!

[References:

bizjournals.com

hollywoodreporter.com

]

About 

I've been writing newsletters since 1999. I've worked for some great sites over the years and have had my work focused on by major networks and radio stations. Now I've been focusing on the entertainment consumer angle on mostly the sci-fi, fantasy and action genres of TV, movies and books. Mostly.

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